the sheer, unadulterated thrill ...

In 2013 The Prime Movers were asked to reform in order to play their 1989 debut, Sins Of The Fourfathers, in its entirety for Cyanide Records’ 25th anniversary bash. Graham, Allan and Wolf, who hadn’t played in that particular configuration since the release of the fourth and final Solarflares album in 2004, clearly had a ball and embarked on a series of occasional live dates, incorporating choice cuts from elsewhere in their estimable back catalogues and rechristening themselves Graham Day & The Forefathers.

            To whit, this long player, on which the erstwhile trio rattles through a dozen career highlights in the no-frills, bang it down live fashion we’ve come to expect. The split: six Solarflares tunes, three from The Prisoners, two from Graham Day & The Gaolers and one from The Prime Movers, whose ‘The Good Things’ opens preceedings and lends the set its apt title.

            For die-hard fans of the boys’ 30-plus years as the garage kings of the Medway delta, there’s much fun to be had in hearing these fresh interpretations. A new guitar lick here; a more outrageous drum fill there; a newly-minted harmony vocal to prick up the ears and return the listener to the moment they first heard ‘Mary’, ‘Can’t Get You Out Of My Mind’ or ‘Whenever I’m Gone’. For newcomers (whom there surely can’t be many of after all these years) there’s the sheer, unadulterated thrill of hearing a class act playing some shit-hot songs like their lives depended on it. The group’s enjoyment of its newfound freedom is evident in every hook, every power chord, every excited yelp. Chief yelper Graham Day’s voice retains its youthful charm and power, its rough edges hewn by maturity and experience. Wolf Howard can seemingly pull endlessly inventive, risk-taking drum patterns out of his watch pocket, while Allan Crockford’s bass underpins the whole thing with a stately fluidity rarely heard from bands bearing the legend “garage”.

            Welcome back boys. We’ve missed you.

Andy Morten

Andy Morten